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The whole package

There is a pool of money and staffing that is reserved by The Salvation Army for contracted, social endeavours. There are other financial resources and other personnel that are internally funded for Salvation Army corps, to use in their evangelical pursuits. And there is an overarching, holistic, all of life mission; one that acts accountably concerning its fiscal requirements and still acts to try to help meet the physical, spiritual, societal and emotional needs of those people whom it serves.


Where should The Salvation Army best place its resources, the better to help fulfil the mission objectives; to care for people, create faith pathways, build healthy communities, and work for justice?
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Where should The Salvation Army best place its resources, the better to help fulfil the mission objectives; to care for people, create faith pathways, build healthy communities, and work for justice?

‘I don’t want to do just one of those four mission goals,’ says Captain Steven Smith. ‘I want to do them all, well, together. I think that is possible.’
 
‘It’s about having a very clear, well thought-through and defined strategy that will change and grow, and be reviewed regularly by the new board structure,’ Dr Elli McGavin says.

‘It’s about being intentional about having resources used, in line with the strategy, so we can measure, understand, evaluate and really be tight about the sorts of things we are going to do. It’s being strategic in the way we haven’t been able to be in recent history.

‘Speaking with and for clients; knowing who we are, what we do, and what our clients need; informing the organisation; delivering the required assistance and designing appropriate responses.’

I agree with Elli, it has got to be strategic,’ Captain Stuart Glover says. ‘I’d like to see local communities flourishing, but that doesn’t prescribe a particular mode of missional work. It comes back to the strategy, and each community has to develop its own strategy…

‘The Salvation Army in those local communities has got to develop its own strategy. For some, housing might be really important. In other spaces, it may be something else.

‘Caring for people, creating faith pathways, building healthy communities, and working for justice – they are four pillars of the same mission. You can’t say that this particular expression of mission is about faith pathways, and that that other one is about a just society.

‘Every expression of The Salvation Army has to have all four components of it; all four pillars … otherwise it is not an expression of The Salvation Army, and the roof will fall down.’ 

‘For us to have a healthy Australia, and a healthy Salvation Army, all four pillars have to correlate with each other,’ explains Major Begent. ‘They’re inter-dependent upon each other.

‘Every Salvation Army expression needs to demonstrate how it is meeting the four mission pillars ...  If you are building a healthy community, then naturally you would care for people; that’s the only way you can build a healthy community. And creating faith pathways is part of a healthy community anyway; people being able to express their spirituality, in whatever shape of form that takes.

‘And because we live in a world where quite a number of people are ignored, justice has to be a very strong component of what we do.’

‘We are a really big movement,’ notes Captain Steven Smith, ‘and coordinating our momentum is a challenge. We want to transform Australia, but we need to do this in communities, hand in hand with people. There is an inherent tension; between national impact and local relevance.

‘Salvation Army mission requires us to help everybody understand their contribution and its value, within the strategy, so that we can see our best possible impact.’